Layered

I don’t like taking pictures with my phone. Compared to the clarity I enjoy with my DSLR cameras, my phone’s lens seems a distant last resort. Over the past couple weeks, I’ve tried my best to see its limitations as an opportunity for growth. The capacity to compose a good picture and to capture unexpected moments is essential to photography. There is no reason why I can’t accomplish those two goals with my phone camera.

Last weekend I took this picture while gazing up at the canopy of a forest dominated with sugar maples:

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Had I used my DSLR, I doubt I would have opted for a wide angle that showed all the layers of change in this little patch of forest. There would have been little green in my telephoto shot. In using my phone, I could only opt for the wide angle, which proved to be the best vantage point in this scene.

Layered

My Favorite Ash Tree is Done

Ash trees peak early during leaf season; they are almost bare by the time the red maples change color. There is a grove of ash trees I’ve been visiting each fall for the past ten years. I love this particular set of trees because some of their leaves were at eye level, allowing me to capture the subtle differences in the colors of their leaves. Last year I thought I missed them because the trees were already bare by the time I visited them. This year I went to them early and realized that the trees had stopped growing leaves at all. They must have been a casualty of the emerald ash borer problem in Ohio.

I’m glad I was able to get the picture above two years ago. Despite that I’d been hearing about the emerald ash borer for several years, I didn’t consider that those particular trees would be gone because of them.

I’ve taken pictures of buildings that were later demolished. I did not anticipate that I’d be taking pictures of natural things that would become defunct, too.